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March 12, 2020

Straub Medical Launches the Rotarex S Atherectomy Device in the United States

March 12, 2020—Straub Medical LLC, the United States direct-sales subsidiary of Switzerland-based Straub Medical AG, announced the launch and first intervention performed in the United States with the Rotarex S atherectomy device for treating occlusive peripheral vascular disease in both upper and lower extremity arteries. Straub Medical has been marketing the Rotarex S device outside of the United States for more than two decades.

According to Straub Medical, the Rotarex S is a hybrid device that removes both atheroma and thrombus at the same time, which the company describes as the "MATH" process: mechanical atherectomy plus thrombectomy. Use of the device is not restricted by the nature of the occluding material, nor by the length of the occlusion, noted the company.

The device, which is designed to treat vessels with diameters of 3–8 mm, is available in 6- and 8-F configurations and compatible with an 0.018-inch guidewire. The Rotarex S catheter head is composed of two overlying metal cylinders, each with two side openings. The outer cylinder, with facets at its foremost tip, is connected to the rotating helix, and the inner cylinder to the catheter shaft. The helix and the outer cylinder rotate at approximately 40,000–60,000 rpm, depending on the model, driven by means of a motor and the connected drive system.

Baljeet Uppal, MD, from Sun City, Arizona, treated the first patient in the United States with Rotarex S. The patient, who was 70 years of age, had a 5-cm long, calcified, chronic total occlusion of the popliteal artery.

In the company's press release, Dr. Uppal commented, “The Rotarex S device performed flawlessly in opening the occlusion and restoring flow. It was simple to operate with a relatively short procedure time and no complications. The patient was able to go home just a few hours after the intervention. Dr. Uppal added, “In a field crowded by atherectomy devices, Rotarex S provides revascularization of the lower extremities in virtually all lesion types, be it thrombus, soft, or calcified plaque. In the process, it has minimized distal embolization. I see it becoming our tool of choice in the coming times.”

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