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August 31, 2016

CSI Launches “Take A Stand Against Amputation" Program for PAD Awareness Month

September 1, 2016—To coincide with the beginning of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) awareness month, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI) announced the launch of a public awareness and patient advocacy program, Take A Stand Against Amputation, to provide education about the disease and treatment options.

With the program, CSI is seeking to raise awareness about PAD to encourage early screening and treatment. This program also focuses on increasing awareness of critical limb ischemia (CLI), which puts people at high risk of amputation, and stresses that there are treatment options. CSI’s goal with this program is to raise awareness and reduce the number of amputations to fewer than 100,000 within 3 years.

The program’s website, www.StandAgainstAmputation.com, contains information about PAD and CLI for people with the disease, those who are concerned they may have it, and their families and caregivers. The website also contains materials that physicians can use to educate people about the disease.

During PAD Awareness Month, and continuing year-round, CSI is encouraging the public and physicians to take advantage of the educational resources to learn more about the risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options for PAD to help save limbs. With a proper diagnosis and treatment plan, most people can manage the symptoms of PAD, with their doctor’s help, to avoid the worst complications, such as amputation.

In the company’s announcement, Bryan Fisher, MD, a vascular surgeon with Tri-Star Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, commented that PAD Awareness Month presents an opportunity to ensure that patients know they have treatment options. Dr. Fisher stated, “If someone receives a diagnosis of PAD or CLI and the recommended treatment is amputation, they should ask for a second opinion. There have been important advances that enable more treatment options that may prevent the need for amputation, or at least lessen the impact.”

Dr. Fisher also encourages other physicians—especially primary care physicians, podiatrists, and wound care specialists—to become educated about these new treatment options. These health care professionals are often the first to learn about or see first-hand the symptoms of PAD. He added, “These health care professionals can find specialists in their area who can help them deliver improved outcomes for their patients. This disease can have a serious impact on the quality of people’s lives, and appropriate treatment can help them get back to living more fulfilling lives.”

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September 1, 2016

CardioVascular Coalition Recognizes PAD Awareness Month

September 1, 2016

CardioVascular Coalition Recognizes PAD Awareness Month